Jameela Jamil Just Won a Major Victory in Her War with the Kardashians

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Kim Kardashian is going to HATE this! Actress Jameela Jamil just won a major victory in her campaign against influencers who use social media to push diet pills, hair growth vitamins, and “flat tummy” teas to impressionable young fans.

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Jameela’s Victory

British actress Jameela Jamil, who plays the upper-crust socialite Tahani on The Good Place, started the “I Weigh” campaign to encourage women on social media to look beyond the number on the scale to find their worth. She targeted the Kardashian clan, in particular, calling them out for their frequent sponsored posts for diet products.

Then her change.org petition called, “Stop celebrities promoting toxic diet products on social media” garnered almost a quarter of a million signatures.

It seems that Instagram was listening. The social media platform–where influencers like the Kardashians reach millions of fans with every post, and often earn millions, too–just announced a major overhaul to their policies.

Now, if an influencer promotes diet vitamins or appetite-suppressing lollipops, the content will be blocked from their under-18 fans. They also won’t be able to make claims that they’ve lost huge amounts of weight or other miracles from a particular product.

Why Should We Listen to Her?

Jamil was pleased that Instagram made the changes, telling Elle UK: “It sets the tone that this is not ok in our society. We have hyper-normalized flogging nonsense to young impressionable people. These people are selling hair growth gummies, but wearing extensions or photoshopping themselves to look slimmer and selling a weight loss shake.”

The Good Place actress, who has campaigned for body positivity and fairness in advertising, said, “There are so many lies being told and we’ve accepted that as a cultural norm.”

Jamil has come under fire by some critics who claim that someone who looks like her–nearly six feet tall with an enviable figure–shouldn’t be the face of a body positivity campaign. Those critics might not realize the struggles that Jamil has been through, including an eating disorder, a car wreck that left her briefly paralyzed, and a period in her early twenties when she gained nearly 70 pounds due to a medical condition.

She told an interviewer that, during the time when she was struggling with her weight, “There would be photographers sitting outside my house all night and all day calling me a fat C-word to my face in hopes that I would cry.”

Now, she claims, people are more willing to hear her message about body positivity and how influencers profit from the diet industry. Instagram was certainly willing to hear it–do you think Twitter and Facebook might follow?